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‘John Lewis: Good Trouble’ highlights the civil rights icon’s remarkable life

‘John Lewis: Good Trouble’ highlights the civil rights icon’s remarkable life

“John Lewis: Good Trouble” derives its title from a favorite saying of the civil-rights icon and longtime congressman, but “Being John Lewis” — and witnessing the effect he has on those who meet him — might be equally apt. A fitting if slightly disjointed tribute, the CNN Films documentary is somehow both timely and timeless in honoring a man who has spent his entire adult life in the public arena.

“When you see something that is not right … say something! Do something!” Lewis is shown saying, time and again, in speeches and appearances, counseling his audiences on the periodic need for “good trouble, necessary trouble.”

For Lewis, shown in his early 20s as a Freedom Rider, at the March on Washington and walking across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in 1965, that has included enduring beatings by police and dozens of arrests, some of which, he adds wryly, came during his time in Congress.

“The reason why he’s effective as a leader is because he’s lived it,” says the late Elijah Cummings, one of several congressional colleagues — including Nancy Pelosi, Alexandria Ocasio- Cortez, Rashida Tlaib, Ayanna Pressley, Ilhan Omar and Cory Booker — who provide perspective and anecdotes, along with Bill and Hillary Clinton.

Much is made, amusingly, of the awe that Lewis inspires among people, recognizing that encountering the 80-year-old legislator is essentially a direct link to some of US history’s signature events. An aide quips that walking through an airport with him takes far longer than the actual number of steps required.

Because Lewis became an activist at an early age, his biography is given relatively short shrift. The most salient personal details — provided in part by Lewis’ siblings — surround his courtship and marriage to his wife, Lillian, who died in 2012.

Directed by Dawn Porter (“Bobby Kennedy for President”), the film’s strongest asset is inevitably the extensive access enjoyed to Lewis himself, who speaks eloquently about the nation’s long road to justice and equality (“We’re not quite there yet”), his emotional response to Barack Obama’s election and his commitment to fight for what he believes (“As long as I have breath in my body, I will do what I can”).

In terms of drawbacks, the film hopscotches around a bit too much, jumping back and forth in time — a byproduct, perhaps, of the volume of ground there is to cover, a trait also evident in Hulu’s recent four-part Hillary Clinton biography, “Hillary.”

The filmmakers are also there to observe election night in 2018, capturing the exultation when the Democrats took back the House. That victory aside, the erosion of the Voting Rights Act that Lewis fought to enact in the 1960s is presented as a call to action and a focal point of the work yet to be done.

Beyond previously unseen material, the most intriguing interlude highlights Lewis’ 1986 campaign for his Georgia congressional seat, against longtime friend and fellow civil-rights activist Julian Bond. The bare-knuckles nature of that contest temporarily frayed their relationship — they’re shown conducting an awkward interview after the race — displaying a tougher side to Lewis that offers some balance to his saintly image.

Mostly, though, “Good Trouble” appears content to bask in Lewis’ larger-than-life persona, which includes a grandfatherly elder-statesman status that allows him to refer to 47-year-old Beto O’Rourke, the former Texas congressman and presidential candidate, as “this kid.”

Lewis — who is battling pancreatic cancer — was not much more than a kid when he marched alongside Martin Luther King Jr., and has seemingly lived three lives since then. That’s why despite the documentary’s uneven aspects, his legacy is ample motivation for any student of history to see “Good Trouble” as a good investment.

“John Lewis: Good Trouble” will be available in select theaters and on demand beginning July 3.

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Cardi B and Megan Thee Stallion’s new video stuns fans with a surprise appearance by Kylie Jenner

Cardi B and Megan Thee Stallion’s new video stuns fans with a surprise appearance by Kylie Jenner

When the music video for Cardi B and Megan Thee Stallion’s first collab dropped Friday, one revelation left fans stunned: Kylie Jenner.

The music video for “WAP” features the two rappers luxuriating in a huge, pastel-toned mansion — strutting down hallways and dancing with cheetahs.

About halfway in, the music stops and is replaced by the sound of clicking heels. The camera zooms in on the edge of a cheetah-print gown and slowly moves up. Anticipation is built. Then, it is revealed: Jenner, who says nothing in the video yet warrants a 25-second pause.

Many fans, it seems, were not exactly thrilled — so much so that a petition to remove Jenner from the video has already received more than 33,000 signatures in less than 24 hours.

The description of the petition gets right to the point: “The video was perfect until we saw K and I wanted to throw my phone.”

On person took matters into her own hands, editing Jenner’s part out of the video and uploading it onto Twitter, where it has almost 300,000 views.

Jenner isn’t the only cameo in the “WAP” video. Artists like Normani, Mulatto, Sukihana and Rubi Rose are given cameos toward the end, in an effort to uplift fellow female musicians.

The problem many have with Jenner’s appearance is rooted in her history of what’s been coined as “blackfishing,” an attempt at mimicking the look and style of Black women. Just this year, Jenner posted a photo of herself on Twitter in a long, curly blonde wig with noticeably darker skin.

“When will your family be done cosplaying Black women?” one user bluntly asked.

Her appearance has become so denounced that Betty White began trending on Twitter in an effort to have White replace Jenner in the video.

But regardless of some fans’ opinion of Jenner, the video has been a hit, garnering 21 million views on YouTube in less than 24 hours.

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